Symmetry

The linear symmetry is a symmetry in which a line divides a given figure into two identical halves then we say that the given figure has line symmetry. The line is called the axis of symmetry or line of symmetry. A figure is said to have point symmetry about a point called the centre of the figure, if for every point on the figure, there is another point directly opposite to it at the same distance on the other side of the centre. A line has only one line of symmetry. This line of symmetry is the perpendicular bisector of the line. It also has a point-symmetry. This is the mid-point of the line. An angle has one line of symmetry. This line of symmetry is the angle bisector of the angle. An angle does not have a point-symmetry. A scalene triangle has neither line of symmetry nor a point-symmetry. An isosceles triangle has one line of symmetry and it is the bisector of angle included between equal sides. It does not have a point-symmetry. An equilateral triangle has three line of symmetry. These are the angle bisectors of the triangle. It does not have a point-symmetry. A square has four line of symmetry. These are the lines joining the midpoints of the opposite sides. It has one point-symmetry. It is the point of intersection of diagonals. Keywords: Rectangle, Kite, Isosceles trapezium, regular pentagon, regular hexagon, circles.

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