The Magnetic Effects of Electric Current

The magnetic effects of electric current are a bit more complicated than most people think. Magnetic fields do not just emanate from the wire but also from the power supply and any other nearby wires. This is an important concept to keep in mind when designing circuits with alternating currents, as it can have some surprising consequences!

What Is A Magnet?

A magnet is a material or object that produces one or more magnetic fields. In most cases, magnets are made of iron and have the ability to attract certain objects such as paper clips, pieces of metal (iron), other magnets, etc., which usually have ferromagnetic properties.

What is the Magnetic Effect?

A magnetic effect is an apparent force exerted on another object because of the presence and orientation of a magnet. It can also be defined as “the influence which one magnet or set of magnets has upon another”.

In engineering, there are three types of effects that must always be taken into account: attractive forces such as those in electromagnets, repulsive effects such as those used in actuators and eddy currents, and mechanical stresses that cause magnetization.

What Are Magnetic Fields?

A magnetic field is a space surrounding a magnet or one end of an unbroken electric current. Magnetic fields can be created by moving charges (electric currents) and static pieces of iron, nickel, cobalt, and some other materials that have ferromagnetic properties.

Types of Magnetism

  • The first type of magnetism is called electromagnetic induction.
  • The second type of magnetism is called the permanent magnetic effect.
  • The third type of magnetism, which does not exist in nature but can be created by scientists, is known as electromagnetism.

What is the Right-Hand Thumb Rule?

The right-hand thumb rule is help you visualize the direction of an electric current.  It is said that if the thumb, the forefinger, and the middle finger of the right hand are bent at right angles to one another with the thumb pointed in the direction of motion of a conductor relative to a magnetic field and the forefinger in the direction of the field, then the middle finger will point in the direction of the induced electromotive force

Magnetic Field Due To Current Through A Circular Loop

  • A magnetic field due to current through a circular loop can be calculated by determining the area of the loop and calculating how many times it crosses an inch.
  • The strength of this field is proportional to the size of the area, so if you use a larger diameter for your circle, then there will be more loops crossing in one inch (and thus a stronger magnetic field).
  • Magnetic fields do not just emanate from the wire but also form around power supplies and any other nearby wires.
  • The strength of an electric current in a coil is proportional to the area of the loop – so if you use a larger diameter for your circle, then there will be more loops crossing in one inch (and thus a stronger magnetic field).
  • Additional loops will also be created by any other nearby wires or power supplies, so the strength of these fields is proportional to their size.
  • This can have some surprising consequences when designing circuits with alternating currents!

Magnetic Field Due To Current in Solenoid

The magnetic effect of a current in a solenoid is related to the radius. The strength of this field depends on the length and radius, so if you use an electron with more loops around it (longer wire), then there will be a larger area for these loops to cross over in one inch – thus increasing their strength!

Force On A Current Carrying Conductor in A Magnetic Field 

The force on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field can be calculated by figuring the strength of the magnetic field and calculating how much it opposes its motion. This is called Lenz’s Law – which states that if you move an electric charge, then this will create its own electromagnetic fields (which are opposite to these charges’ original ones).

  • Lenz’s Law states that if you move an electric charge (or current), then this will create its own electromagnetic fields.
  • The force on a conductor is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and inversely proportional to the length of time for which it was charged or discharged.

If we consider the speed of the current and its length, then we can see that a given amount of charge will produce an electromagnetic field with strength proportional to these parameters.

What is Fleming’s Left-Hand Rule?

Fleming’s Left-Hand Rule specifies the direction of an electric current by using your fingers to curl around in a circle. If they are pointing out from a coil (in the shape of your hand), then this will create magnetic fields that push away from them towards the center of the coil – which means it is always flowing in one direction.

What is Electromagnetic Induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the phenomenon where an electric current running through a wire creates its own magnetic field. This happens because moving charges create electromagnetic fields of their own, and this will be opposite to the original ones – so if we consider Lenz’s Law, then it can explain why these fields are created in this way.

  • When a wire is carrying a current, then the voltage difference between it and any nearby wires will create an electric field.
  • The magnetic fields created by this can have some surprising consequences when designing circuits with alternating currents!

What is an Electric Generator?

An electric generator is a device that can produce an electric current from mechanical energy. In Lenz’s Law, it states that if you move an electric charge (or current), then this will create its own electromagnetic fields – which are opposite to the original ones.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a magnetic field?

Magnetic fields do not just emanate from the wire but also form around power supplies and any other nearby wires. The strength of an electric current in a coil is proportional to the area of the loop – so if you use a larger diameter for your circle, then there will be more loops crossing over in one inch, and this will create a stronger magnetic field.

Explain The Magnetic Effects of Electric Current

A magnetic effect relates to the radius. The strength of a selenoid’s field is proportional to its length and radius, so if you use an electron with more loops around it (longer wire), then there will be a larger area for these loops to cross over in one inch – thus increasing its strength!

Discuss Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor in A Magnetic Field

The force of an electron is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and inversely proportional to the length of time for which it was charged or discharged. If we consider the speed at which the current travels and its length, then we can see that a given amount of charge will produce an electromagnetic field with strength proportional to these parameters.