Symmetry

Symmetry is when one shape becomes exactly like another if one flips, slide or turn it.

If a line divides a given figure into two identical halves, then the given figure is symmetrical about that line and the figure is said to have a line symmetry.

A figure has one line of symmetry, if there is a line about which the figure may be folded so that the two parts of the figure coincide each other completely.

If a line divides a given figure into two identical halves, then the given figure is symmetrical about that line and the line is called the axis of symmetry.

A figure may have no line of symmetry, only one line of symmetry, two lines of symmetry or multiple lines of symmetry.

A Rectangle has two lines of symmetry. An equilateral triangle has three lines of symmetry. A square has four lines of symmetry. A regular pentagon has five lines of symmetry. A regular hexagon has six lines of symmetry. A circle has multiple (infinite) lines of symmetry.

Line symmetry and mirror reflection are naturally related and linked to each other. While dealing with mirror reflection, the left - right changes in orientation are taken into account.

Symmetry has plenty of applications in everyday life as in art, architecture, textile technology, design creations, geometrical reasoning, etc. Many road signs and designs on some playing cards have lines of symmetry. Many natural things have symmetry in their shapes.

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