Reading for Comprehension

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  • Q1

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:

    (1) The boy found the kites from Japan hidden in a dark passage of the house. Snehamoy helped him take out the kites from the box. Lifting each delicately by its staff, and spread them out on the courtyard.

    (2) They fixed the day of celebration for Biswakarma—the god of machines to be their kite-flying day. But first, they’d have to be ready with rolls of line to fly. The kites. Lines sharpened with a coating of finely ground glass to cut those of their rivals. A suitable field must be found, one with a good view of the horizon and free of trees to prevent the lines getting tangled up in the branches. Their hearts pounded at the thought of a kite-fight. Like a sensible teacher, Snehamoy sat the boy down with his exercise book. If each kite takes five hundred feet of line to fly, how many feet would twenty kites take ? he asked the boy, The boy frowned. ‘Only five hundred feet for each kite ! What if they get tangled with other during a fight and keep circling away needing more and more ?’

    (3) The two spent a whole afternoon asking neighbours for empty glass bottles.

    Snehamoy’s aunt smashed them in her kitchen, then ground the shards in a pestle, pricking her thumb in the process. Glue was added to the glass granules, and a touch of vermilion dye to have the lines stand out against the blue sky and the clouds. After returning from school, Snehamoy joined the boy in stringing lines from one end of their courtyard to another. Then, like workers, they wrapped their palms in soft cotton cloth, took lavish dips in the pail of abrasive, and went from one end of a line to another, carefully applying a uniform layer over it. In the end, they sat back in the kitchen and admired the brilliant maze turning their courtyard into a field of red pepper.

    (4) For days, pedalling to and fro from school, Snehamoy heard the village buzzing with the impending kite-fight. Rival groups of boys formed teams and were spurred on by a shopkeeper who was offering his regular kites free to anyone who was willing to brave the foreign invasion. Yet on the day of the grand contest. as the first of the Japanese kites came out of the box and heaved by its flyers, went up over the school building, there was a pall of silence.

    It was a giant Baromon, crushing the helmet of a samurai warrior between its teeth. Scarlet and ochre, it hung still, face up, refused to be cowed by the stiff breeze.

    (5) Standing in a circle with the boys. Snehamoy strung the kites, gaze fixed on the sky. Like characters in a play, they made their appearance one by one. The Tsugaru whirred like an airplane through a clever loop fixed on its back. The crowd went into a roar over the kabuki faces, which floated in the sky like stained glass windows lit by the afternoon sun. Soon the lines were crossing and tangling up the kites with a steady stream of taunts spurring on the flyers. The boy reached inside the kite box and scooped out more. Instantly the field buzzed with humming and whistling kites shaped as cicadas, gnats, dragonflies and dancing carps. It felt like a carnival and drew the crowd’s applause.

    [Adapted from “The Japanese Wife”

    by Kunal Basu]

    (a) (i) Use each of the following words as used in the passage in a sentences of your own construction so as to bring out its meaning very clearly. Using the word in a context very similar to the passage will be penalised. [Marks 5]

    (1) field..... (2) horizon ..... (3) rival .... (4) contest......

    (5) scooped .....

    (ii) For each of the words given below, write a sentence of at least 10 words using the word unchanged in form, but with a different meaning from that it carries in the passage: [Marks 4]

    1. staff

    2. line

    3. ground

    4. uniform

    (iii) Explain, in the context of the passage in not more than two sentences of your own, the meaning of each of the following expressions taken from the your own, the meaning of each of the following expressions taken from the passage (merely using phrases will not do). [Marks 4]

    1. ...... have the lines stand out against the blue sky and the clouds.

    2 ...... the brilliant maze turning their courtyard into a field of red pepper.

    3. ..... were spurred on by a shopkeeper who was offering his regular kites free to anyone who was willing to brave the foreign invasion

    4. It felt like a carnival and drew the crowd’s applause.

    (b) Answer the following questions in your own words as briefly as possible.

    i. Where did the boy find the kites? [Marks 1]

    ii. How did Snehamoy and the boy decide how much line each kite would need? [Marks 2]

    iii. What effect did the impending kite-flight have on the villagers? [Marks 2]

    iv. Describe the first kite which was heaved into the sky. [Marks 1]

    v. How did kites flown by Snehamoy and the boy add to the atmosphere of joy and brightness? [Marks 1]

    (c) In not more than 100 words of your own, describe the arrangement made by Snehamoy and his companion before the kite-flight. (Failure to keep within the word limit will be penalised.) [Marks 10]

    Marks:30
    Answer:

    (a) (i)

    1. Soccer is played on a rectangular field where two teams of 11 players, aim to kick or head the ball into the other team's goal.

    2. Tourists enjoy lazing in Goa beach and watching the beautiful sunset on the western horizon.

    3. When you beat your rival you may be pumped up, even if you didn't win the race.

    4. Beauty contest is a competition that focuses more on the physical beauty of the contestants than their intellectual calibre.

    5. The sadhu scooped up a handful of water from the river, blessed it and sprinkled on the disciples to sanctify them.

    (ii)

    1. Clerks, peons, accountants, etc. are included in the non-teaching staff of a school.

    2. The teacher told the students to fall in line for lunch.

    3. Two boys fell on the slippery ground and fractured their legs.

    4. Students are not required to wear uniform on the Children’s Day in some schools.

    iii.

    (1) In order to make the line of the kite more visible against the blue sky and clouds Snehamoy and the boy added a bit of vermilion dye in the mixture of smashed glass and glue.

    (2) Snehamoy and the boy applied the abrasive mixture on the lines and spread them in the courtyard for drying it. It was looking nice in bright red, and their courtyard appeared to be a maze of red pepper.

    (3) The teams of rival groups were encouraged by the local shopkeepers to fight bravely against the Japanese kites. There were offering free kites to the contestants.

    (4) The sky was filled with numerous kites of different colours and shapes. Many people gathered there to witness the spectacular sight of flying kites with lots of joy and excitement

    (5) which created an atmosphere of a beautiful carnival.

    (b)

    (i) The boy found the kites in a box which was hidden in a dark passage of the house.

    (ii) Snehamoy and the boy sat down with an exercise book and tried to calculate the quantity of lines required for flying 20 kites five hundred feet high each.

    (iii) The rival groups of boys formed groups due to the impending kite-flight and the local shop-keepers and offered free kites to all who are willing to take part in the competition in order to defeat foreign invasion.

    (iv) The flyers lifted the first kite over the school building making all holding their breath. It looked like huge demon, baromon crushing the helmet of a Samurai warrior between its teeth. It had the mixed colours of scarlet and ochre. It hung still in the air facing up unaffected by the still breeze.

    (v) Snehamoy and the boy pulled out different kites one by one from the box and flew them in the sky. The kites made a spectacular display in the sky which look like the characters in a play. The crowd was watching with excitement when Tsugaru flew in the sky like an airplane and they went in roar over the kabuki faces. The kites floating in the sky were dazzling like stained glass windows in the afternoon sun.

    (c) Snehamoy and the boy spent a whole afternoon asking neighbours for empty glass bottles. His aunt helped them to smash the bottles and ground the shards in a pestle pricking her thumb in the process. The glass granules were mixed with glue and vermilion dye was added to it in order to make the colour of the line stand out against the sky and the clouds. Then they strung the lines from one end of their courtyard to another. Tying the hands with cotton cloth they applied the abrasive mixture on the lines and made a uniform layer over them. [100 words]

    View Answer
  • Q2

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow. (30 marks)

    1. University of Cambridge is an institution of higher education, the second oldest university in the United Kingdom after the University of Oxford. It is located in the city of Cambridge, Cambridge shire.

    2. The University of Cambridge is a loose confederation of academic faculties and departments, and 31 colleges. There are over 15,500 full-time students taught at the university: 11,000 undergraduates and 4,500 graduates. Although the colleges and the university per se are separate bodies, all are parts of an integrated educational entity. The university examines candidates for degrees during their residency and at the conclusion of their studies; confers degrees; regulates the curricula of the colleges and the system of education; deals with disciplinary problems; and administers facilities, such as libraries, lecture rooms, and laboratories that are beyond the scope of the colleges. The colleges provide their students with lodgings and meals, assign tutors, and offer social, cultural, and athletic activities. Every student at the University of Cambridge is a member of a college.

    3. The academic year is divided into three terms of approximately eight weeks each: Michaelmas (autumn), Lent (late winter), and Easter (spring). Students are required to be in residence for the duration of each term. Much of the year's work is done, however, out of term time, during the holidays. Students usually study under the supervision of members of the college's faculties, who maintain close relationships with the small groups of students in their charge and assist them in preparing for university exams.

    4. Bachelor of Arts degrees may be conferred upon the satisfactory completion of exams, after nine terms, or three years of residency. Majority of students are candidates for honours degrees and take a special examination called a tripos (named after the three-legged stools on which examiners formerly sat). Successful candidates for triposes are classified as first, second, or third class according to their standing. Other degrees conferred by the university include the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, as well as higher doctorates in law, medicine, music, science, and theology.

    5. The University of Cambridge figured prominently in the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. The Dutch scholar Desiderius Erasmus was a professor of Greek and divinity at Cambridge from 1511 to 1514 and translated the New Testament from Greek into Latin there; the religious reformers William Tyndale, Hugh Latimer, and Thomas Cranmer were educated at Cambridge. As a result of the decrees of Henry VIII establishing the Church of England, the humanistic method of study replaced the scholastic. Canon law studies were ended, public lectures in Latin and Greek were held, and the Bible was studied in the light of contemporary learning.

    6. A reaction took place, however, during the reign of Elizabeth I, when Cambridge became a stronghold of Puritanism. Restrictive legislation enacted in 1570 transferred teaching authority to the heads of the colleges. In 1604, early in the reign of James I, the university was granted the right to elect two members to the English Parliament; this right was ended in 1949. During the 17th century the group of scholars known as the Cambridge Platonists emerged, and, through the influence of such faculty members as the scientists Isaac Barrow and Sir Isaac Newton, an emphasis on the study of mathematics and natural sciences developed for which Cambridge has subsequently become renowned.

    1. Answer the following questions in a sentence or two: 2x4= 8

    i. What is the duration of the three terms in every academic year?

    ii. What are basic functions that the colleges perform in respect with the students?

    iii. Does the University provide only bachelor degrees? Explain.

    iv. In which period of history was there a massive shift in the fields of study for the University and what were they?

    In the following two questions, find out the right answer from the choices given: 2x2=4

    v. What is not true about the students’ lifestyle?

    (a) The students prepare their works especially during the three terms of eight weeks in every academic session.

    (b) The faculty members help the students in preparing for the exams.

    (c) During the holidays the students have to work hard.

    (d) The students spend more time in the colleges than at home

    vi. What is not true about the changes that overtook the Cambridge University during the reign of Queen Elizabeth and during the 17th century?

    (a) Study of Mathematics became a stronghold for the University.

    (b) More freedom was awarded to the University in different aspects through legislation.

    (c) The University’s right to elect two members to the Parliament was ended.

    (d) There were some other changes during the 17th century.

    2. Find out words from the passage which mean the following: 2x2=4

    (i) alliance (Para 2)

    (ii) educational (Para 5)

    3. Write the summary of the passage in not more than 250 words. (14 marks)

    Marks:30
    Answer:

    1. (i) Eight weeks for each term.

    (ii) The colleges provide their students with lodgings and meals, assign tutors, and offer social, cultural, and athletic activities.

    (iii) No, apart from bachelor degrees, the University also provides other degrees such as Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, as well as higher doctorates in law, medicine, music, science, and theology.

    (iv) In the 16th century, due to the decrees passed by Henry VIII, there was a shift from scholastic studies to humanistic and thus public lectures in Latin and Greek and study of Bible were given importance.

    (v) a. The students prepare their works especially during the three terms of eight weeks in every academic session.

    (vi) b. More freedom was awarded to the University in different aspects through legislation.

    2. (i) Alliance–Confederation

    (ii) educational-Scholastic

    SUMMARY:

    Cambridge University is the second oldest university in the United Kingdom located in the city of Cambridge. It has 31 colleges and over 15,500 full-time students. The university examines candidates for degrees during their residency and confers degrees; regulates the curricula; deals with disciplinary problems; and administers facilities, such as libraries, lecture rooms, and laboratories. The colleges provide their students with lodgings and meals, assign tutors, and offer social, cultural, and athletic activities. The academic year is divided into three terms of approximately eight weeks each. BA degrees may be conferred upon the satisfactory completion of exams, after nine terms, or three years of residency. Majority of students opt for honours degrees and take a special examination called a tripos. Other degrees conferred by the university include the MA and PhD in various streams. As a result of the decrees of Henry VIII establishing the Church of England, the humanistic method of study replaced the scholastic. Public lectures in Latin and Greek were held, and the Bible was studied in the light of contemporary learning. Restrictive legislation enacted in 1570 transferred teaching authority to the heads of the colleges. During the 17th century the group of scholars known as the Cambridge Platonists emerged, and, through the influence of such faculty members as the scientists Isaac Barrow and Sir Isaac Newton, an emphasis on the study of mathematics and natural sciences developed for which Cambridge has subsequently become renowned.

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  • Q3

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow. [30 marks]

    Explorers are a special kind. They embody the finest spirit in human nature, which is to seek out new challenges, discover new worlds and create new frontiers. May 29, 2003 marked the 50th Anniversary of one such rare achievement of the indomitable human spirit— the ascent of Mount Everest by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.

    The Himalayas have cast a spell on mankind since time immemorial. The legendary ancient poet Kalidasa calls them a measuring rod to gauge the world's pride. They seem to sit like a brooding elephant sprawled over several thousand kilometers. In a world increasingly ravaged by mindless violence, people seek refuge in the mountains for spirituality and transcendence. Others, for whom religion is not the motivation, come to seek adventure.

    The tallest peak in the world is full of awe and mystery, and its legend precedes the heroic tales of the men of the Everest, who conquered it. In 1852, the then Surveyor General of India, Colonel Andrew Waugh, based on the findings of the Trignometrical Society of India, named the highest found summit—Peak XV. Later, he named it after his predecessor Colonel George Everest. For the Sherpas, it remains the mountain goddess, Sagarmathathe forehead of the sky. The famous snow plume skimming off its top gives it a sense of unrivalled loftiness and almost immediately calls for reverence. Nature plays out terror and triumph intermittently on these mountains. Moments of glory can turn into events of tragedy in a few seconds; but one community seems to have mastered the mystery of the mountains — the Sherpas.

    The Sherpas are a Tibetan tribe, who migrated to Nepal about 400 years ago. Their ability to brave the vagaries of high altitudes has helped them to prosper and they have come a long way from being just porters to being mountaineers. They are the unofficial gatekeepers of the summit and they are believed to understand its moods and expressions. They look for ominous signs such as a high soaring raven or a flag cloud and they offer special prayers to their deity to let the peak be benevolent.

    Tenzing Norgay was a Sherpa also, who tried seven times to reach the summit but was successful only once. He was a simple, unlettered man yet spoke seven languages. He couldn't write but authored several books by dictation. On top of the Everest, he dug a hole in the snow and buried some sweets and a pencil stub his daughter had given him as offerings to the mountain. Several years later, his son Jamling Tenzing Norgay also achieved the same feat, followed by Tenzing's grandson Tashi Tenzing Sherpa, the first third generation man to scale the peak.

    Tenzing's companion, Sir Edmund Hillary, was a beekeeper prior to his summit attempt. Several years hence, his son Peter Hillary, became the first son of a summiteer from the west to conquer the Everest.

    (a) (i) Use each of the following words as used in the passage in a sentence of your own construction so as to bring out its meaning very clearly. Using the word in a context very similar to the passage will be penalised. [5]

    1. embody

    2. sprawled

    3. refuge

    4. precedes

    5. mystery

    (ii) For each of the words given below write a sentence of at least 10 words, using the same words unchanged in form, but with a different meaning from that which it carries in the passage: [4]

    1. spirit

    2. summit

    3. cloud

    4. peak

    (iii) Explain, in the context of the passage, in not more than two sentences of your own, the meaning of the following expressions taken from the passage. (Merely using phrases will not do) [4]

    1. to sit like a brooding elephant.

    2. full of awe and mystery.

    3. Nature plays out terror and triumph intermittently.

    4. The unofficial gatekeepers of the summit.

    (b) Answer the following questions as briefly as possible in your own words:

    (i) How are the Himalayas fascinating?[2]

    (ii) What is the attitude of the Sherpas towards the mountains? [2]

    (iii) Who are the Sherpas and how have they transformed themselves from being just porters to mountaineers?[1]

    (iv) What did Tenzing Norgay do when he conquered the mountain? [1]

    (v) Why are the explorers called a special breed? [1]

    (c) In not more than 100 words, describe different views of people about the Everest. [10]

    Marks:30
    Answer:

    (a) (i)

    1. The spirit of romance is embodied in the character Rosalind.

    2. Two lions were lying sprawled in the forest.

    3. People took refuge from the bombing in the local temple.

    4. A verb is usually preceded by the subject in English.

    5. The police are trying to solve the mystery of the murder.

    (a) (ii)

    1. The spirit of the dead will always be with us.

    2. The G8 summit will be held in Delhi in July.

    3. A few dark clouds drifted across the sky.

    4. 4. The traffic reaches its peak at about 5.30 in the evening.

    i. The Himalayas are fascinating as it’s a measuring rod to gauge the world’s pride. It’s a spiritual solace for the peace lovers and adventurous for the explorers. It sits like a brooding elephant sprawled over several thousand kilometres.

    ii. The Sherpas considers the Himalayas as the mountain goddess, Sagarmatha. They are the informal gatekeepers of the mountain. They can understand the moods and expressions of the mountain and offer prayers to their gods to make the peak kind and generous.

    iii. Sherpas are a tribe of Tibet migrated to Nepal. Their courage and bravery to face any unexpected change of high altitudes helped them to become mountaineers.

    iv. Tenzing Norgay dug a hole in the snow on the top f the mountain and buried some sweets and a pencil stub when he conquered the Everest.

    v. The explorers are called a special breed because they exemplify the finest strength in human nature- to hunt for new challenges, to discover new worlds and to create new frontiers.

    (c) The Everest, the tallest summit in the world is full of fear and mystery .For explorers, the Himalayas are always fascinating and adventurous. For Kalidasa, it’s a measuring rod to measure the pride of the world. The Himalayas are just like an ominous giant with arms and legs stretched out over thousands of kilometres. The peace lovers search for refuge in the mountain for spirituality and transcendence. The Sherpas believe that it is the mountain goddess, Sagarmatha. They hope for ominous signs and offer special prayers to it to let it be benevolent, and pay respect to it.(100 approx.)

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  • Q4

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow: [30]


    I rested for a moment at the door of Anand Bhavan. On Market Road, where coffee drinkers and tiffin eaters at their tables sat transfixed uttering low moans on seeing me. I wanted to assure them, “Don’t fear, I am not out to trouble you. Eat your tiffin in peace, don’t mind me … You, nearest to me, hugging the cash Box, you are craven with fear, afraid even to breathe. Go on, count the cash, if that’s your pleasure. I just want to watch, that’s all If my tail trails down to the street, if I am blocking your threshold : it is because I’m told, I’ m eleven feet tip to tall. I can’t help it. I’m not out to kill I’m too full--found a green pasture teeming with food on the way. Won’t need any for several days to come, won’t stir, not until I feel hungry again.

    Tigers attack only when they feel hungry, unlike human beings who slaughter one another without purpose or hunger…

    To the great delight of children, schools were being hurriedly closed. Children of all ages and sizes were running helter-skelter screaming joyously. ‘No school, no school. Tiger, tiger!’ They were shouting and laughing and even enjoyed being scared. They seemed to welcome me. I felt like joining them, and bounded away from the restaurant door and trotted along with them, at which they gleefully cried, ‘The tiger is coming to eat us; let us get back to the school!’

    I followed them through their school gate while they ran up and shut themselves in the school hall securely. I ascended the steps of the school, saw an open door at the far end of a veranda, and walked in. It happened to be the headmaster’s room, I believe, as I noticed a very dignified man jumping on his table and heaving himself up into an attic. I walked in and flung myself on the cool floor, having a partiality for cool stone floors, with my head under the large desk--which gave me the feeling of being back in the Mempi cave…

    As I drowsed, I was aware of cautious steps and hushed voices all around. I was in no mood to bother about anything. All I wanted was a little moment of sleep; the daylight was dazzling. In half sleep I heard the doors of the room being shut and bolted and locked. I didn’t care. I slept.

    While I slept a great deal of consultation was going on. I learnt about it later through my master, who was in the crowd – the crowd which had gathered after making sure that I had been properly locked up – and was watching. The headmaster seems to have remarked some days later, ‘Never dreamt in my wildest mood that I’d have to yield my place to a tiger … A Wag had retorted, ‘Might be one way of maintaining better discipline among the boys.’

    Now that this brute is safely locked up, we must decide,’ began a teacher. At this moment my master pushed his way through the crowds and admonished ‘Never use the words “beast” or “brute.” They’re ugly words coined by humans in their arrogance. The human beings think all other creatures are “beasts”. Awful word!’.

    a. Give the meaning of each of the following words or phrases as used in the passage. One word answers or short phrases will be accepted.

    (i) transfixed (line2)

    (ii) helter-skelter (line 14)

    (iii) admonished (line 40) [6]

    (b) Answer the following questions briefly in your own words.

    (i) What reassurance did the tiger give the coffee drinkers? [2]

    (ii) In what way are tigers different from human beings? [2]

    (iii) Why were the children delighted? [2]

    (iv) What did the headmaster say some days later? [2]

    (v) What was the wag’s response? [2]

    (vi) Which sentences tell us that the tiger’s owner had great respect for the tiger? [2]

    (c) (i) In not more than 60 words describe the tiger’s activities from the time it followed the school children till it slept. [10]

    (ii) Give a title to your summary in 3(c). Give a reason to justify your choice.

    Marks:30
    Answer:

    a. i) transfixed – continued to look at or listen to someone or something without moving

    ii) helter-skelter - in hurry and confusion

    iii) admonished – scolded

    (b) i) The tiger reassured the coffee drinkers that he meant no harm to them and they need not be afraid of him. They could continue to eat their tiffin and drink coffee in peace. He just wanted to watch them.

    ii) Tigers attack only when they feel hungry, unlike human beings who slaughter one another without purpose or hunger. Ironically, humans are more brutal than so called brutes.

    iii) To the great delight of children, schools were being hurriedly closed. Also, they seemed to welcome the tiger. They loved being scared. iv) The headmaster seems to have remarked some days later that he had never dreamt in his wildest mood that he would have to yield his place to a tiger. v) A wag had retorted that it might have been one way of maintaining better discipline among the boys, hinting at the inability of the headmaster to do so. vi)The sentences which the master spoke when he pushed his way through the crowds and admonished them never to use the words “beast” or “brute” for wild animals as they were ugly words coined by humans in their arrogance. He also added that the human beings used an awful word “beasts” for all other creatures.

    (c) i) Points according to the question:

    • The tiger followed the children through their school gate
    • Ascended the steps of the school, saw an open door at the far end of a veranda, and walked in
    • The headmaster’s room
    • Walked in and flung itself on the cool floor

    Draft:

    The tiger followed the children through their school gate and climbed the steps of the school. Seeing an open door at the far end of the veranda, it walked into the headmaster’s office. The headmaster had jumped into the attic. As the tiger found the floor was cool, it put its head under the table and went to sleep.

    ii) The Title is: The Cool Tiger

    The tiger was so much sure of what it wanted and had no problems. The others were losing their cool around him but it went on to walk in the headmaster’s office and went off to sleep.

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  • Q5

    Read the passage given below and answer the questions (a), (b) and (c) that follow.

    BOYHOOD AND BALANCE

    (1) My eldest boy has just turned nine. One day not long after, he was on his way to the pool on his bike when he slammed on his brakes in front of me and did a really neat skid. He looked back and gave me his cheesy smile of satisfaction.

    (2) Normally that little skid would have provoked a stern warning not to “wear out your tyres.” I was always taught to take care of my things and keep them in good shape. I‘ve come to learn, though, that there is a difference between the natural course of wearing things out and trying to make things last at any price. The difference became acute to me one bright sunny day four years ago.

    (3) My then five - year – old boy had spent a normal summer afternoon playing in the park and swimming at the neighbourhood pool. At his bath time that night, I noticed he had small red spots all over his body. Some kind of measles, I thought, and called my wife to take a look. By pure chance, the next day he had an appointment with his paediatrician.

    (4) Several tests (and long hours) later, the doctors figured my son had an illness, called ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura), which causes your spleen to kill off your body’s own blood clotting platelets. If it got worse, he could bleed to death internally. Only time would tell whether it would get better on its own. You can imagine the fear that crept into our hearts.

    (5) Three days into his stay at the hospital, I went to pick out a present for him. I reached for a yellow toy convertible (he loves scars). My hand hesitated. I knew that it wouldn’t last long with a five- year-old boy. Then I thought to myself: So what if the doors break off and the wheels fall off. If those things happen, it will mean he is alive and well. I bought it in the hope that he would be well enough to play with it. He was thrilled to receive it, and it helped him pass the week he spent at the hospital.

    (6) I saw the car the other day, sitting on a shelf in his room. The wheels have fallen off, the doors are broken and all of the chrome has worn off. I see it and I smile to myself. My boy has been perfectly well these past four years and is full of vitality. His mysterious illness came and went.

    (7) And I learned that things are things and can be replaced if necessary. If any one of my three boys happens to break something or wear it out playing with it, instead of chastising him for carelessness. I now prefer to celebrate his boyhood. The empty shell of what once was a nice car, the balding tyre of his new bike, the lost pieces of his Monopoly game, all bear witness to the fact that there lives a healthy, happy boy.

    (8) Prudence and preservation have their place, as do experimentation and curiosity. In the end, it is my relationships with my sons and my wife that have real lasting power. I choose to celebrate our lives and live with the losses.

    (9) Besides, I used to skid my tyres the same way- just not in front of my dad.

    Adapted from “Elliot Van Egmond---The Globe and mail”

    (a)

    (i) Given below are four words and phrases. Find the words which have a similar meaning in the passage:

    (1) Strict

    (2) Energy and vigour

    (3) Scolding

    (4) strong desire to know

    (ii) For each of the words given below, write a sentence of at least ten words using the same word unchanged in form, but with a different meaning from that which it carries in the passage:

    (1) shape (line 7)

    (2) park (line 12

    (3) present (line 22)

    (4) well (line 27)

    (b) Answer the following questions in your own words as briefly as possible:

    (i) Why is the disease ITO so serious?

    (ii) What does the yellow car look like at present?

    (iii) What did the writer learn from his experience?

    (iv) What is most important to the writer now?

    (c) Summarize the given passage in not more than 100 words. Failure to keep within the word limit will be penalised. You will be required to:

    (i) List your ideas clearly in point form.

    (ii) In about 100 words, write your points in the form of a connected passage.

    Marks:30
    Answer:

    Marks

    30

    Answer

    (a)

    (i)(1)stern

    (2)Vitality

    (3)chastising

    (4) curiosity

    (ii) Make sentences......

    (1) I did not like the shape of the rock placed in the garden.

    (2) Please park your car somewhere else as this is meant for parking the staff vehicles.

    (3) Many important celebrities were present in the grand wedding yesterday.

    (4) The well located at the outskirts of the village has dried up completely.

    (b)

    (i) The disease ITP is serious because if it got worsened one could bleed to death internally.

    (ii) The wheels of the yellow car have fallen off the doors have broken and all the chrome has worn off.

    (iii) The writer learned that things are things and can be replaced if necessary. He has also learned to enjoy the boyhood of his son.

    (iv) It is most important for the writer to celebrate the boyhood of his sons.

    (c)

    (i) (1) The passage is about a man who has always been taught to take good care of his things.

    (2) Four years ago his son was diagnosed of ITP, a fatal disease, because of which he could die.

    (3) During hospitalization, he bought a yellow car. Though his son was too young for it but he still bought it.

    (4) His son’s disease came and went but the writer learned a lesson. Things are things and can be replaced, but life is more precious.

    (ii) The passage is about a man who was taught to take care of his things. Later he realised that natural course of wearing things differs from making things last at any point. Four years ago his son was diagnosed of ITP, a fatal disease. While his son was hospitalised he bought a yellow car for him. He knew the car would break but he still bought it because if the broke, it would mean his son is in good health to play with it. His son’s disease came and went but the writer learned a lesson that things are things and can be replaced if required, but life is invaluable.

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