Fishing in India

Fish is an important resource. Fish are rich in vitamin A, B and D. They are also a great source of protein. They are used in many medicines. They are commercially useful and provide the base for a big industry. There are 30,000 species of fish in the world, out of which about 18,000 species of fish are found in India. Fishing is important in India in the coastal areas of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Odisha and West Bengal. There are two types of fish catch in India: Sea or Marine Fisheries Inland or Fresh Water Fisheries Marine fishing is done on the continental shelf up to a depth of 200 metres. 75% of the marine fish landings are on the west coast and 25% is on the east coast. The natural advantage of India is that it has the marine potential of 20 to 25 million tonnes of fish catch, but only 10-12% of fish are caught. Only 11% of the potential fishing grounds are more than 200 m deep but Indian technology is not able to make a proper use of that. There is a lack of good fishing grounds as Indian coast does not have many gulfs, bays, estuaries and backwaters. Marine fishing in India is a seasonal phenomenon. Strong winds and tropical cyclones often hinder the fishing operation. Riverine fishery resources comprise the major river systems of Ganga, Brahmaputra, Indus, Mahanadi, Narmada, Tapi, Godavari and Yamuna. The inland capture fish production has increased from 192,000 tonnes in 1950 to 781,846 tonnes in 2007. India produces about 3% of the world’s fish. It occupies seventh place among the fish producing countries. Fishing provides employment to over one million people in India. Indian fisherman catches about 2,000 to 2,500 kg of fish every year. Seafood exports are an important component of food exports, as they constitute more than 70% of food exports. An exclusive body for fisheries development called ‘National Fisheries Development Board’ (NFDB) was established during September 2006. ‘Coastal Aquaculture Authority’ (CAA) was established for the regulation of coastal aquaculture activities.

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  • Q1

    The exclusive body for fisheries development which was established in 2006 is

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    Answer:

    National Fisheries Development Board (NFDB).

    Explanation:

    An exclusive body for fisheries development called ‘National Fisheries Development Board (NFDB)’ was established during September 2006.

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  • Q2

    Mahim region in Maharashtra is famous for

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    Answer:

    Estuarine fisheries.

    Explanation:

    Mahim and other creeks in Maharashtra are famous for estuarine fisheries.

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  • Q3

    The fishing ground of Kerala covers a distance of

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    Answer:

    590km.

    Explanation:

    The fishing ground of Kerala covers a distance of 590km of coast line which comprises of a large number of lakes and lagoons.

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  • Q4

    In terms of fish production, India ranks

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    Answer:

    7th position.

    Explanation:

    India ranks 7th position in terms of fish production in the world. It produces nearly 3% of the total fish production in the world.

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  • Q5

    About 22000 species of fishes have been recorded in the world; of which, about---------- are found in Indian waters.

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    Answer:

    11%

    Explanation:

    About 22000 species of fishes have been recorded in the world; of which, about 11% are found in Indian waters. 

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